Japan

  • Busch, Simone K.

    Simone K. Busch

    Born in Berlin, Germany
    Living in Tokyo, Japan
    http://simonekbusch.blogspot.jp/

  • Gilbert, Richard

    Richard GilbertRichard Gilbert

    Born 1954 in Connecticut, USA
    Living in Kumamoto, Japan
    http://gendaihaiku.com
    http://sailing-across-oceans.org
    Hear the poet reading a selection of his haiku
    Contact the poet

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  • Ikeda, Sumiko (池田澄子)

    Ikeda SumikoIkeda Sumiko (池田澄子 Ikeda Sumiko)

    Born 1936 in Kamakura, Kaganaga Prefecture, Japan

    Grew up in Nîgata Prefecture. Began composing haiku in her 40s. Studied haiku with Horî Kei and Mitsuhashi Toshio. Won the 36th Modern Haiku Association Award in 1989, and So Sakon Haiku Award in 2006. Became a Kadokawa Haiku Award judge. Her major haiku collections are, Sky Garden [Sora no niwa] (1998); Before I Knew I Was Born as a Human [Itsushika hito ni umarete] (1993); Gendai Haiku Collection Vol. 29: Ikeda Sumiko [Gendai haiku bunko 29: Ikeda Sumiko] (1995); The Sailing Ship [Yukufune] (2000); Story on a Soul [Tamashî no hanashi] (2005); Dear Sir in Reply [Haihuku] (2011).

    Translations into English by Richard Gilbert & Ito Yuki (Gendaihaiku, 2014)
     

  • Kaneko, Tōta (金子 兜太)

    Kaneko Tōta

    (The poet's family name is Kaneko)
    Born 1919 in Saitama Prefecture, Japan

  • Kawana, Tsugio, (川名つぎお)

    Kawana TsugioKawana Tsugio (川名つぎお)

    Born 1935 in Tokyo, Japan

    Currently, Secretary of the Modern Haiku Association (Gendaihaikukyôkai), and General Manager of the Yearbook Department. He is a professional screenwriter and playwright. He is the winner of the Okinawa Memorial Day Haiku Prize, 2004. In 1957, he entered Kokugakuin University, and founded the Film Club. That same year he produced the short film, Chîsana gen'ei [The Little Mirage: An Urban Boy’s Dream, 20 min.], the first independent movie produced by a student in Japan (excepting those of the Fine Arts program at Nihon University).

    In 1958, he focused on the problem of education in rural areas, producing the short film, Yama ni ikiru ko ra [The Children Live in a Mountain; 27 min.]. This was his first professional work. In 1965, he founded the Partisan Style Poetry Book Club [Paruchizan shiki shishu no kai], and gathered donations for the publication of his own book of poetry. As a result, Hatachi no gûwa [The Fables of Twenty] was published.

    In 1968, he became deeply involved in significant social movements of the era — anti-war, anti-nuclear, anti-establishment, etc. He published his book of poetry, Seishun no kigen [The Origin of Adolescence], then made a film featuring night-school students in poverty, Dakkan soshite kaihô [Get Back and Liberate It; 87 min.]. This film created newfound enthusiasm among student-movement activists to produce their own works, especially via Zengakuren [the All-Japan Federation of Student Self-Governing Associations]. Moreover, he edited a poetic anthology of a group of young activist-authors, Eikyû kakumei no koiuta [Love Song of Permanent Revolution], published in 1969. His major haiku collections are Tei [Degree] (Modern Haiku Association Press, 1992), Jin [Questions] (Modern Haiku Association Press, 2005), and Ani [However] (Modern Haiku Association Press, 2014).

    Translations into English by Richard Gilbert & Ito Yuki (Gendaihaiku, 2014)

     

  • Maeda, Hiroshi (前田弘)

    Maeda HiroshiMaeda Hiroshi (前田弘)

    Born 1939 in Osaka, Japan

    Moved to Hokkaido in 1943, and grew up there. In high school, he founded the haiku journal-group, Kaze [Wind], which later became Haguruma [Gears]. Studied haiku with Suzuki Ishio, and moved to Tokyo in 1963. He joined the Modern Haiku Association in 1982, becoming Executive Director [kanji], Chief of the Yearbook Department, and Chief of the Advertising Department of the MHA, in 2001. Became the official leader of the Haguruma journal-group in 2006. Later, became the chief editor of the Gendai Haiku Journal of the MHA. Won the 2010 “Second Prize,” 65th Modern Haiku Association Award. In the following year, won the “First Prize” of the 66th Modern Association Award.

    Translations into English by Richard Gilbert & Ito Yuki (Gendaihaiku, 2014)


  • Morisu, Ran (森須蘭)

    Morisu RanMorisu Ran (森須蘭)

    Born 1961 in Tokyo, Japan

    Graduated from Ferris Women’s Junior College (now Ferris Women’s University). She began writing haiku during her days at Ferris, and joined the MHA in 1993. Within the MHA, she worked as a committee member of the Youth Department, the Study Department, the Junior Study Department, and the Information Technology Department. Today, she works as a committee member of the Yearbook Department, and is the Executive Director of the Tokyo Chapter of the MHA. She is also a judge of the “ITO-EN Ôi Ocha New Haiku Contest.” She has led her journal-group Dionysian [Saien] since 2000. Her major haiku collections include, Only to See You [Kimi ni au tame] (2000), and The Sky Ship [Sorafune] (2010). She has also published educational books, such as Memorizing 100 Haiku to become a Master (2009).

    Translations into English by Richard Gilbert & Ito Yuki (Gendaihaiku, 2014)

     

  • Ôi, Tsuneyuki (大井恒行)

    Ôi TsuneyukiÔi Tsuneyuki (大井恒行)

    Born 1948 in Yamaguchi Prefecture, Japan

    Attended Ritsumeikan University night school, in Kyoto. Although he wasn't a member of any sectarian group, he was committed to the Ampo protests of the 1970s. In his Junior year, he dropped out of school and went to Tokyo to become a writer. Today he is a member of the Modern Haiku Association and the Japan Writers’ Association. He is a judge of the Modern Haiku Association Awards for New Poets. He is also President of the National Bookstore Workers, and the Workers Union Connection Council.

    Translations into English by Richard Gilbert & Ito Yuki (Gendaihaiku, 2014)

     

  • Suzuki, Hideo

    Born 1946 Tokyo, Japan
    Living in Sanda, Hyogo prefecture, Japan.

  • Takajo Mitsuhashi

    Mitsuhashi TakajoMitsuhashi Takajo

    (24 January 1899 – 7 April 1972)

    One of the great Japanese haiku women poets Mitsuhashi Takajo was born on 24 January 1899 near Narita, Chiba.  She was a haiku poet of the Shōwa period. She was an admirer and disciple of Akiko Yosano. She got married in 1922 and started writing haiku under the influence of her husband, but then later turned to experimental haiku along with other women poets. By 1936 she became part of a group that founded the short-lived Kon (dark blue) publication and in 1940 had the collection Himawari or Sunflowers published. In 1953 she became involved in Bara (薔薇, dt. "Rose") - a progressive magazine of avant-garde poets who allowed experimental haiku. She has been referred to as a religious ascetic or one who led a life of asceticism and spiritual concentration. She is said to have written works of self-alienation of the vanishing of the empiric Ego in the Void, which according to Kenneth Rexroth “resembles Kierkegaard’s rather than the Buddhist concept.” A statue of her is at Shinshoji Temple. Back in 1964, Blyth, in his History of Haiku, identified her as "the chief woman writer of haiku in Japan."

    Her last collection, in 1970, dealt somewhat with death as she had been ill for years.

    She is also placed as one of the "4 Ts" of Japanese female haiku poets, the other three being Tatsuko Hoshino, Nakamura Teijo, and Hashimoto Takako.

    She died on 7 April 1972.

    Haiku collections:

     

    • Himawari (向日葵, dt. "Sunflower") in 1940;
    • Uo no hire (Fins of a Fish)
    • Hakkotsu (白骨, dt. "The Bleached bones") in 1952;
    • Shida-jigoku (歯朶地獄, dt. "The Fern Hell") in 1961;
    • Buna (ぶな, dt. "Beech"), 1970.

    Selected work:

    climb this tree
    and you'll be a she-devil
    red leaves in the sunset glow


    up on a hydro pole
    the electrician turns
    into a cicada

    (Far Beyond the Field: Haiku by Japanese Women, by Makoto Ueda, Columbia University Press, 2003, pp.109-110)

    *

    winds of autumn -
    water less transparent
    than the fins of a fish

    (Haiku Mind, Patricia Donegan, Shambhala Publications. 2008, p.195)

    *

    O bird’s singing!
    The dead walk
    on the plain of the sea.


    The hair ornament of the sun
    has sunk
    into the legendary sea.

    (Women Poets of Japan by Ikuko Atsumi; Kenneth Rexroth, New Directions, 1977, p. 80)

    *

    春水のそこひは見えず櫛沈め  三橋鷹女

    shunsui no sokoi wa miezu kushi shizume

    not able to see
    spring water’s bottom…
    I sink my comb

    (from “Haiku Dai-Saijiki” (“Comprehensive Haiku Saijiki”), Kadokawa Shoten, Tokyo, 2006)

    *

    口中一顆の雹を啄み火の鳥や

    Kōchu ikka no hyō wo tsuibami hi no tori ya

    A hailstone held
    in its beak,
    the firebird soars

     (From Mitsuhashi Takajo Zenkushū (Collected Haiku of Mitsuhashi Takajo, 1976)

    *

    老いながら椿となつて踊りけり

    oinagara tsubaki to natte odorikeri

    as I get older
    I will become a camellia
    and dance and dance

    秋の蝶です いつぽんの留針です

    aki no choo desu ippon no tomebari desu

    I am an autumn butterfly
    I am just one pin

    (Tr. Gabi Greve)

    Sources:

  • Takatô, Akane (高遠朱音)

    Takatô AkaneTakatô Akane (高遠朱音)

    Born 1985 in Tokyo, Japan (birth name Kaneko Risa)

    Won the “ITO-EN Ôi Ocha New Haiku Contest” in 1999. Joined the MHA in 2000, as its youngest-ever member. In 2007, graduated from Risshô University and began work in web design. At the same time began work as a committee member of the Junior Study Department of the MHA. Her major haiku collection is Night Flyer (2009).

     

  • Taneda, Santōka (種田 山頭火)

    TanedaTaneda Santōka (種田 山頭火)

    3 December 1882 – 11 October 1940

  • Tennakoon, Anusha

    Anusha Tennakoon

    Born 1978 in Sri Lanka
    Living in Osaka, Japan
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